Monday, November 25, 2019

TasWater questions council fees

Cr Martyn Evans discussing his Glenora Rd
funding proposal at last week's meeting.
A REQUEST to reduce the council fees on a huge water infrastructure project at New Norfolk will be countered with a proposal to spend surplus funds on roadworks.

TasWater has asked the Derwent Valley Council to reduce its estimated development application fees totalling $370,000 on its proposed $200 million upgrade of the Bryn Estyn water treatment plant.

The council on Thursday night agreed to negotiate, but said it would prefer to charge the full amount. It had not recently had a development application for a project of this value, and it was suggested its own costs could exceed $100,000.

Councillor and former mayor Martyn Evans said the council should offer to spend any change from the estimated fee of $370,000 on upgrades to Glenora Rd. Cr Evans said this council-owned road provided access to the Bryn Estyn plant and was in need of upgrading. “It would be a good use – a community service agreement with TasWater,” Cr Evans said.

In a letter to the council, TasWater said the proposed fee was excessive, suggesting $35,000 to $40,000 would be more appropriate. Built just outside New Norfolk in 1962, the Bryn Estyn plant provides more than half of greater Hobart’s drinking water.

“The TasWater Capital Delivery Office propose to upgrade and expand the water treatment plant to ensure it can continue to provide high quality drinking water and meet projected demand … to 2046,” TasWater’s Eve Lancaster said in the letter to the council.

Councillors Frank Pearce, Luke Browning and Julie Triffett spoke of the need to negotiate the fee to be charged to TasWater, with Cr Browning pointing out that the council had costs other than those involved in planning, with TasWater's activities at Bryn Estyn likely to cause further deterioration of Glenora Rd.

1 comment:

  1. "In a letter to the council, TasWater said the proposed fee was excessive, suggesting $35,000 to $40,000 would be more appropriate. Built just outside New Norfolk in 1962, the Bryn Estyn plant provides more than half of greater Hobart’s drinking water". Therefore requesting to put a cap on the fee.

    Being in the room on the night did give a feeling of what a thing. I was struck by the fact that we own the company TasWater & have made it known that the Council would like to sell our shares.

    It all played out as our company wanting in a way special treatment. Owners asking owners to reconsider the fees. "Council has received a request from TasWater (which we own) to negotiate a potential reduction in the Development Application fees for the three (3) separation applications required to complete the upgrades to the Bryn Estyn Water Treatment Plant."

    This is a big thing on two fronts it has been awhile since a project of the estimated value of $200 million dollars & Council does not have a policy regarding the waiving of fees for Development Applications. The point to make here is that the request is not to waive. By comparing Derwent Valley Council to the other Councils there are two different fee structures one is 'no capped fees' & the other is 'capped.'

    Here is the sting in the tail..."Councillor and former mayor Martyn Evans said the council should offer to spend any change from the estimated fee of $370,000 on upgrades to Glenora Rd. Cr Evans said this council-owned road provided access to the Bryn Estyn plant and was in need of upgrading. “It would be a good use – a community service agreement with TasWater,” Cr Evans said.

    "Council should offer to spend" 'our money (TasWater) on our (council-owned roads) and so it goes. This all could be a huge first by creating a new look un-capped version.

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