Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Local water plant struggling to keep up

TASWATER'S Bryn Estyn treatment plant near New Norfolk is struggling to keep up with Hobart's increased demand for water as summer approaches.

Following a period of below-average period of winter rainfall across south-eastern Tasmania, both TasWater and Tasmanian Irrigation are preparing for what could be unprecedented pressure on the water system.

Farmers have been asked to reduce their usage from Bryn Estyn, which supplies water to the irrigation network as well as domestic supplies for New Norfolk and greater Hobart.

TasWater chief executive Michael Brewster said the Bryn Estyn plant was facing reduced capacity due to the need for enhanced water treatment to address taste and odour issues and the removal of pathogens for drinking water customers.

“TasWater is supportive of Tasmanian Irrigation and our farmers and is working collaboratively with all parties to find alternative sources of water, including recycled water which is used to capacity throughout the Coal River Valley," Mr Brewster said.

“TasWater will continue to work to meet our commitment to irrigators without compromising the supply of drinking water to our Hobart customers. Through our water conservation messages, TasWater in conjunction with the State Government is promoting the efficient use of water and reminds all Tasmanians, one of the best ways to increase the amount of water available is to be careful and not waste it," he said.

TasWater is in the process of upgrading the Bryn Estyn plant to increase its capacity, which should be completed early in 2023.

1 comment:

  1. "Following a period of below-average period of winter rainfall across south-eastern Tasmania, both TasWater and Tasmanian Irrigation are preparing for what could be unprecedented pressure on the water system".

    At the last election I had idetified five key trends affecting what we are aiming for resource stress & climat change are the two trends captured in this story.

    Resource stress related to the combined pressures of growth in the number of peolpe, economics, expansion and climate change impacts on daily life. "Farmers have been asked to reduce their usage from Bryn Estyn, which supplies water to the irrigation network as well as domestic supplies for New Norfolk and greater Hobart". People, economics, expansion & impacts on daily life "reduce/domestic suppy".

    Climate change and building capacity and resilience to repond challenges such as bush fire( demand for water) waste management health & wellbeing keeping in front of mind that both waste & health require water.
    I started off with the quote about "a period of below average" and our ability as a community to build capacity & resilience for the challenges ahead.

    Summing up in my study of how/why water is related to food security heres the thing..

    Jem Bendell, a former consultant to the United Nations and longtime Professor of Sustainability Leadership at the University of Cumbria’s Department of Business, delivered a paper in May 2019 explaining how people and communities might “adapt to climate-induced disruption.”

    "In 2011 the global population [reached] 7 billion. At the beginning of the 20th Century we were just 1.9 billion people on the planet, and now we are 7 billion and by 2050 there will be 9 billion. The planet’s capacity is already over extended.

    We do not have enough fresh water for the people. Water shortages will give rise to various military conflicts, which I am sure will happen if we do not resolve the water problems. Same for energy and other challenges, including food security".

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