Thursday, November 14, 2019

Windy weather to continue

Bureau of Meteorology


Severe Weather Warning

for DAMAGING WINDS

For people in Upper Derwent Valley, South East and parts of Western, East Coast, Central Plateau and Midlands Forecast Districts.
Issued at 10:07 pm Thursday, 14 November 2019.
DAMAGING NORTHWESTERLY WINDS ACROSS SOUTHEASTERN TASMANIA LIKELY DURING THURSDAY EVENING AND EARLY FRIDAY MORNING
Plan Image
Weather Situation: A strong and gusty west to northwesterly airstream flows across Tasmania ahead of an approaching cold front, expected to cross Friday morning.
DAMAGING WEST TO NORTHWESTERLY WINDS, averaging 60 to 70 km/h with peak gusts in excess of 100 km/h, are possible over parts of southeastern Tasmania.
Elevated areas in the south and southeast may experience damaging winds this evening. Remaining areas in the south and southeast, including HOBART, may experience damaging winds until early Friday morning.
Locations which may be affected include New Norfolk, Bothwell, Hobart, Geeveston, Dover and Dodges Ferry.
The State Emergency Service advises that people should:
* Supervise children closely.
* Check that family and neighbours are aware of warnings.
* Manage pets and livestock.
* Secure outdoor items including furniture and play equipment.
* Be prepared in case of power outages and report any outages to TasNetworks on 132 004.
* Beware of damaged trees and power lines and take care when driving.
* Listen to the ABC radio or check www.ses.tas.gov.au for further advice.
* For emergency assistance contact the SES on 132500.

The next Severe Weather Warning will be issued by 5am Friday.
Warnings are also available through TV and Radio broadcasts, the Bureau's website at www.bom.gov.au or call 1300 659 210

Terry family celebrates 200 years in the valley

Helen and Robin Terry at their property on the Derwent at Gretna.
THE Terry name has been synonymous with agriculture in the Derwent Valley for 200 years, originally milling corn and wheat before diversifying into hop growing, orcharding and primary production.

It’s a record unlikely to be matched in Australia – one family farming on the same river for two centuries – but the story is nearing its end.

A family reunion this Sunday will celebrate the bicentenary of the arrival of John and Martha Terry in Tasmania in December 1819 and it coincides with the decision of hosts Robin and Helen Terry to retire from farming, bringing the Terry era to an end in the valley.

1960s sketch by E. Ratcliff, said to be
 the first house John Terry built at New
New Norfolk in the early 19th century.
John and Martha arrived in Sydney in March 1819 with their eight daughters, three sons, two servants and two millstones. “John and his ancestors had been millers in the Yorkshire Dales for many generations,” great-great-grandson Robin Terry explained.

“He brought with him the equipment to establish a mill in Sydney but Governor Macquarie advised him to go to Van Diemen’s Land where he would give him land grants on rivers suitable for driving mills,” Mr Terry said.

John Terry selected a 40 hectare site at the junction of the Derwent and Lachlan Rivers at New Norfolk and 567ha on the Derwent at Gretna. On the New Norfolk site he built the first water-mill erected outside Hobart.

Tynwald House and the ruins
of the Lachlan River Mill.
This Lachlan River Mill had a plentiful water supply that kept it operating at the height of summer when most others ran dry. Its water came from a 2km-long mill race which tapped into the Lachlan River in the vicinity of the present Humphrey St bridge.

Some of the original grinding stones from the mill can now be seen on display outside St Matthew's Close (Quilted Teapot tearoom) in Bathurst St, New Norfolk. The grand home John Terry built is now known as Tynwald House, a restaurant and bed and breakfast, while the riverflats where his son Ralph planted hops are now the Tynwald Park sportsgrounds and his hop-drying Oast House is today a woodwork school and short-stay accommodation provider.

The Terry millstones outside St Matthew's
Close (Quilted Teapot).
The larger site at Gretna was given the name Askrigg after John Terry’s birthplace in England. The Terrys also acquired properties at Hayes – the well-known Slateford (202ha) and the smaller Sunnybanks – which remained in the family until the turn of the 21st century.

These were orcharding properties, exporting mostly apples and pears, but there was also some livestock production for the local market. For a time there was also the Apple Pip roadside fruit stand which grew to become a well-known stop on the Lyell Hwy for visitors and locals like.

The Terry window in St Matthew's
Church at New Norfolk.
Despite this pedigree, Robin Terry did not take up farming until he retired as a valuer, aged 60, purchasing 140ha on the Derwent at Gretna, which he named Wensleydale after the region in Yorkshire which was home to the Terrys.

With more than 2km of river frontage, this property has been used for agisting and grazing, but after 25 years a second retirement is beckoning and Robin and Helen are looking to a future closer to their family in Hobart.

“We are the last people by the name of Terry to be farming on the Derwent,” Robin said. But the family tradition is far from over, with descendants of John and Martha Terry  growing truffles in the Meander Valley, while others grow grapes at Meadowbank and another manages a cattle station in north Queensland, to name just a few.

The lasting contribution by John and Martha Terry and their descendants is memorialised in a stained-glass window at St Matthew's Anglican Church in New Norfolk.

View of the Derwent Valley from Wensleydale, Gretna.
All branches of the family are welcome at the reunion at noon this Sunday, November 17, at Wensleydale, 21 Clarendon Rd, Gretna. BYO picnic lunch. For more information call 6286 1430.

MyState shuts the door at New Norfolk

MyState Bank has taken down the signs and
closed its New Norfolk branch.
MYSTATE has shut the door on more than three decades of providing financial services to the people of the Derwent Valley, closing its New Norfolk branch last Friday.

The bank announced in August that it would close the New Norfolk branch on November 7, citing a decline in customer transactions due to online and mobile banking services. A spokesman said Derwent Valley customers would be able to bank at any other MyState branch.

In a letter to customers, the bank also said it would remove its ATM in January. The closure leaves the Commonwealth Bank as the last bank in New Norfolk, although some banking transactions can also be done at the Post Office.

MyState had a substantial history in the town, dating back to the 1980s when The Credit Union of Tasmania had an agency in Howlett's store and Island State Credit Union had one a local shoe shop. When those merged in 1986, they stayed in Howlett's store until purchasing the small premises of the National Australia Bank at 31 High St in 1987.

In 1994 Island State relocated to 5 High St for several months while its old premises at 31 High St were demolished and a new branch erected in its place. In 2007 Island State merged with the Connect credit union to form MyState Financial Credit Union of Tasmania. The size of the combined entity and its number of members in the Derwent Valley warranted a further expansion, which resulted in the opening of the new branch in the old Westpac bank at 45 High St in 2008.

Sign of the times.
In 2009 MyState merged with Tasmanian Perpetual Trustees and ceased to be a member-owned financial institution, although it was at pains to insist it had not become a bank. In 2014 the business rebranded as MyState Bank Limited.

It is understood that a discussion will be held next week about the process of establishing a community-owned bank at New Norfolk.

Windy weather warning updated

Bureau of Meteorology


Severe Weather Warning

for DAMAGING WINDS

For people in Upper Derwent Valley, South East and parts of Western, North East, East Coast, Central Plateau and Midlands Forecast Districts.
Issued at 10:19 am Thursday, 14 November 2019.
DAMAGING NORTHWESTERLY WINDS ACROSS SOUTHEASTERN TASMANIA LIKELY DURING THURSDAY, MAINLY DURING THE EVENING
Plan Image
Weather Situation: A strong and gusty west to northwesterly airstream flows across Tasmania ahead of an approaching cold front, expected to cross Friday morning.
DAMAGING WEST TO NORTHWESTERLY WINDS, averaging 60 to 70 km/h with peak gusts in excess of 100 km/h, are possible over parts of southeastern Tasmania as well as the far northeast.
Elevated areas in the south and southeast may experience damaging winds this afternoon and evening. Remaining areas in the south and southeast, including HOBART, may experience damaging winds from late this afternoon until early Friday morning. The far northeast of Tasmania may experience damaging winds this afternoon.
Locations which may be affected include New Norfolk, Bothwell, Hobart, Geeveston, Dover and Dodges Ferry.
Severe weather is no longer occurring in the Furneaux Islands district and the warning for this district is CANCELLED.
The State Emergency Service advises that people should:
* Supervise children closely.
* Check that family and neighbours are aware of warnings.
* Manage pets and livestock.
* Secure outdoor items including furniture and play equipment.
* Be prepared in case of power outages and report any outages to TasNetworks on 132 004.
* Beware of damaged trees and power lines and take care when driving.
* Listen to the ABC radio or check www.ses.tas.gov.au for further advice.
* For emergency assistance contact the SES on 132500.

The next Severe Weather Warning will be issued by 5pm Thursday.
Warnings are also available through TV and Radio broadcasts, the Bureau's website at www.bom.gov.au or call 1300 659 210